wispfox: (Default)
It just occurred to me that the trouble I have remembering/recognizing words relating to architecture could be that I have nothing to associate them to in my head. If I have no visual memory, there's nothing for them to attach to, and using descriptions loses a lot of information.

I wonder if that's actually what's going on, or if it's yet another manifestation of my trouble remembering words for very specific objects (yes, including proper nouns), especially if there is no obvious link to what little Latin I still remember. It's easier to remember words I've seen rather than only heard, though.

Or, I suppose, trouble remembering words at all - given how often I end up flailing and saying 'thingy!' or 'that... thing!'. :) Sometimes it's amazing that I can actually communicate anything!

(I'm much better at remembering where things are in relation to other things, at least small scale. This is probably why we have a front (sitting/living) room, a dining room, and a back (sitting/living) room, at least according to me)

This brought to you by [livejournal.com profile] galaneia referring to a part of a building using a term with which I was unfamiliar. This is a common problem on my part, and she and [livejournal.com profile] metahacker seem to know and use a lot of terminology to describe buildings and parts of buildings.
wispfox: (Default)
Confusing conversation causes questions!

What is an open relationship?

Is it the same as or different than being in a polyamorous relationship? Subset? Superset? Entirely unrelated?

(I was under the impression that it is another term for a polyamorous relationship, but now I'm just confused. :)
wispfox: (Default)
Woooooords.

snuggery is a good word.
wispfox: (Default)
Woooooords.

snuggery is a good word.
wispfox: (Default)
This [livejournal.com profile] grammargasm post (ok, more the comments) is charming the _hell_ out of me.

In other news, calling someone a dork and having them correctly interpret it as an affectionate term charms and delights me. *nod* Yep. Not that this reduces the accuracy of the label, however!

Hmm. I appear to use 'goof', and 'dork' more or less equivalently, alhough the former is far more frequent, since I think I've had it in my vocabulary from childhood. Consistantly, using either means I'm amused and charmed. It also tends to mean that the other person is behaving in a silly (and possibly cheeky, depending on who it is) way, since that's a pretty consistent way to both charm and amuse me. I do also just comment on the silliness, but that requires more than a single word. :)

Unfortunately, I do also use 'silly' to refer to (usually potential or theoretical) behavior whose underlying logic I do _not_ understand. I need a different word for this, I think. Preferably not offensive.

Aaaaanyway. I go. Before I babble even more. ;)
wispfox: (Default)
This [livejournal.com profile] grammargasm post (ok, more the comments) is charming the _hell_ out of me.

In other news, calling someone a dork and having them correctly interpret it as an affectionate term charms and delights me. *nod* Yep. Not that this reduces the accuracy of the label, however!

Hmm. I appear to use 'goof', and 'dork' more or less equivalently, alhough the former is far more frequent, since I think I've had it in my vocabulary from childhood. Consistantly, using either means I'm amused and charmed. It also tends to mean that the other person is behaving in a silly (and possibly cheeky, depending on who it is) way, since that's a pretty consistent way to both charm and amuse me. I do also just comment on the silliness, but that requires more than a single word. :)

Unfortunately, I do also use 'silly' to refer to (usually potential or theoretical) behavior whose underlying logic I do _not_ understand. I need a different word for this, I think. Preferably not offensive.

Aaaaanyway. I go. Before I babble even more. ;)
wispfox: (Default)
Define 'alien', if you would?

Mine, from an attempt at explaining it in a comment from previous previous post:

The behaviors of the people who surrounded me generally made no sense, for most of my life. I was missing the nonverbal portion of communication, and most of the apparently 'obvious' things that most people pick up on.

So, being surrounded by beings whose behavior made no sense, and who mostly had _NO_ idea why I was so very confused, when my confusion made perfect sense to me, made me decide at a very young age that I wasn't actually human, and ended up on the wrong planet (this was probably after I started reading science fiction). Especially since them not understanding why I was confused tended to mean that most people didn't try to explain anything to me.

Most of my life, I spent people-watching, in an attempt to understand what the _hell_ was going on. Anthropological studies, if I had only known it at the time. That helped, some, but people with good skills in such taking the time to try to explain body language and tone and such - so I had a basis from which to try to start to understand such things - made the biggest difference.

In other words, I had to be taught how to speak the most prevalent language of human beings, because I did _not_ pick it up on my own. Ok, I got more than nothing; really dramatic stuff got through. But I never understood why people were so upset with me for not understanding what was going on before then.

--

I note that being different from others is _NOT_ what I mean by alien.

I mean... not being able to comprehend why other people do what they do, for most of my life. _All_ other people, and at least until I started collecting enough data to see patterns, pretty much all non-basic needs behaviors. Family, friends, no one made sense. Some were just kind/aware enough to try to explain things to me. That information - combined with those who tried to explain body language and such - helped with my anthropological attempts.

I mean having (figuratively) beat my head against walls and acted like an anthropologist in order to try to figure things out. I mean having made the poor choice of trying to pretend to be like the other humans, in order to possibly get a better idea of what the hell was going on (not that it worked, but it did mean I still find bits of that remaining in my psyche to pick out again).

It's not 'feeling different'. It's 'you people don't make _SENSE_, this can't really be where I'm from!'.

Not that I have any idea if this is going to be something that is explainable to someone who hasn't experienced it, now that I think about it...
wispfox: (Default)
Define 'alien', if you would?

Mine, from an attempt at explaining it in a comment from previous previous post:

The behaviors of the people who surrounded me generally made no sense, for most of my life. I was missing the nonverbal portion of communication, and most of the apparently 'obvious' things that most people pick up on.

So, being surrounded by beings whose behavior made no sense, and who mostly had _NO_ idea why I was so very confused, when my confusion made perfect sense to me, made me decide at a very young age that I wasn't actually human, and ended up on the wrong planet (this was probably after I started reading science fiction). Especially since them not understanding why I was confused tended to mean that most people didn't try to explain anything to me.

Most of my life, I spent people-watching, in an attempt to understand what the _hell_ was going on. Anthropological studies, if I had only known it at the time. That helped, some, but people with good skills in such taking the time to try to explain body language and tone and such - so I had a basis from which to try to start to understand such things - made the biggest difference.

In other words, I had to be taught how to speak the most prevalent language of human beings, because I did _not_ pick it up on my own. Ok, I got more than nothing; really dramatic stuff got through. But I never understood why people were so upset with me for not understanding what was going on before then.

--

I note that being different from others is _NOT_ what I mean by alien.

I mean... not being able to comprehend why other people do what they do, for most of my life. _All_ other people, and at least until I started collecting enough data to see patterns, pretty much all non-basic needs behaviors. Family, friends, no one made sense. Some were just kind/aware enough to try to explain things to me. That information - combined with those who tried to explain body language and such - helped with my anthropological attempts.

I mean having (figuratively) beat my head against walls and acted like an anthropologist in order to try to figure things out. I mean having made the poor choice of trying to pretend to be like the other humans, in order to possibly get a better idea of what the hell was going on (not that it worked, but it did mean I still find bits of that remaining in my psyche to pick out again).

It's not 'feeling different'. It's 'you people don't make _SENSE_, this can't really be where I'm from!'.

Not that I have any idea if this is going to be something that is explainable to someone who hasn't experienced it, now that I think about it...
wispfox: (tongue)
I think I figured out why (other than just because I was being contrary) I don't have (or want) a harem by my definition, but the definitions used last night were ok (but good at making me blush furiously).

Harem, in my head, implies things like there being a lack of equality. And that I'm supporting them. And they are always around (that would be crowded). And that there is more defined relationship structure than there actually is in [livejournal.com profile] australian_joe's definition of such.

[livejournal.com profile] randysmith's definition is just funny. :) And, of course, the fact that I'm nearly certain that the definitions used were only used so that the word could be made to apply to me certainly caused me to have _reason_ to be contrary about it. In addition, the discussion was making me blush furiously, as I tend to have a difficult time with being made highly visible, even if in a good way and in a group of people I trust. (which probably contributed to the discussion continuing, since it's not as if I blush often)

[livejournal.com profile] australian_joe's definition was the group containing the people that I have kissed, where there is continued mutual interest in doing more than that (regardless of if it's likely that there will be more than that).

[livejournal.com profile] randysmith's definition, which I think no longer even vaguely approximates the original meaning, but was amusing in the 'dear god, I can't even enumerate that list" kind of way, was people I am comfortable cuddling in public. I think that contains pretty much everyone whose company I seek out in a social setting, and since I'm known to periodically have trouble keeping track of who I've not seen a while in that group, especially if they are local, I sure as hell can't enumerate it!

I think the funniest thing about this is that I _was_ actively trying to get everyone who fits [livejournal.com profile] australian_joe's definition, who would be around and known to be interested, at last night's Psinging. Because, dude, singing and many people I care about. What's _not_ to like?
wispfox: (tongue)
I think I figured out why (other than just because I was being contrary) I don't have (or want) a harem by my definition, but the definitions used last night were ok (but good at making me blush furiously).

Harem, in my head, implies things like there being a lack of equality. And that I'm supporting them. And they are always around (that would be crowded). And that there is more defined relationship structure than there actually is in [livejournal.com profile] australian_joe's definition of such.

[livejournal.com profile] randysmith's definition is just funny. :) And, of course, the fact that I'm nearly certain that the definitions used were only used so that the word could be made to apply to me certainly caused me to have _reason_ to be contrary about it. In addition, the discussion was making me blush furiously, as I tend to have a difficult time with being made highly visible, even if in a good way and in a group of people I trust. (which probably contributed to the discussion continuing, since it's not as if I blush often)

[livejournal.com profile] australian_joe's definition was the group containing the people that I have kissed, where there is continued mutual interest in doing more than that (regardless of if it's likely that there will be more than that).

[livejournal.com profile] randysmith's definition, which I think no longer even vaguely approximates the original meaning, but was amusing in the 'dear god, I can't even enumerate that list" kind of way, was people I am comfortable cuddling in public. I think that contains pretty much everyone whose company I seek out in a social setting, and since I'm known to periodically have trouble keeping track of who I've not seen a while in that group, especially if they are local, I sure as hell can't enumerate it!

I think the funniest thing about this is that I _was_ actively trying to get everyone who fits [livejournal.com profile] australian_joe's definition, who would be around and known to be interested, at last night's Psinging. Because, dude, singing and many people I care about. What's _not_ to like?
wispfox: (Default)
Buh. No wonder I have such trouble with spelling. For those who might be surprised by this, based on my generally good spelling here - that's due to a _lot_ of work as a kid, and I still look a lot of words up. http://www.dictionary.com is _so_ my friend. I also memorized and use all those annoying rules about spelling. I also tend to have to re-read everything I write, especially if I'm tired, to find all the mistakes I made and didn't notice. (Interestingly, I _do_ generally have a good sense of what words 'look right', which is a lot of why my spelling seems to be perfectly fine)

"That's where you 'see' a complete word in your mind's eye, whether you're reading it or writing it. And if you can't visualize it, you're just winging it based on what it sounds like. In a language with as many irregularly spelled words as English, you're going to be wrong a lot of the time." (link found in [livejournal.com profile] griffen's journal)

Seeing a word in my mind's eye.

Right.

If any of you have ever either tried to spell something to me without giving me the time to write it down, or wanted me to tell you how to spell something without me writing it down, you've run head on into the fact that - unless it's three or four letters long, and sometimes not even then - I _cannot_ visualize words in my head.

There are some words I can spell aloud without writing them down first. My name, due to long practice. I think that's about it.

I don't know how many of you have noticed that I also don't tend to say numbers combinations as anything but individual digits. It feels... almost related to the above, but not quite, since the words for numbers (eg 'one') and the symbols used (and '1') are, in fact, a fairly effortful and entirely _not_ automatic translation for me, getting exponentially more difficult the longer the number. This makes (for example) singing a song where someone wrote out something like a year entirely in number symbols rather than words slightly problematic. I tend to not be able to figure it out fast enough and sorta stop singing during that piece.

I can also spell words without writing them down if they happen to be easily - and sensibly - broken into smaller words. If I remember that can be done for any specific word. (Like the name of the town I live in)

I wonder if this somehow relates to my major difficulty with pulling words out of my head? And with games like Scrabble?


Uh. "Reading is transforming letters into sound," according to the article I linked to above. Not in _my_ head, it isn't. Translating what I'm reading into sound is quite a lot more effort for me than reading is. Reading aloud probably means I'm not taking in any of what I'm reading. It's why - for the most part, although I'm getting less averse to it - I tend to not read things aloud. (I'm sure the fact that I process written things better than things I'm hearing comes into effect, as well)

Ok, enough being fascinated by this article. :)
wispfox: (Default)
Buh. No wonder I have such trouble with spelling. For those who might be surprised by this, based on my generally good spelling here - that's due to a _lot_ of work as a kid, and I still look a lot of words up. http://www.dictionary.com is _so_ my friend. I also memorized and use all those annoying rules about spelling. I also tend to have to re-read everything I write, especially if I'm tired, to find all the mistakes I made and didn't notice. (Interestingly, I _do_ generally have a good sense of what words 'look right', which is a lot of why my spelling seems to be perfectly fine)

"That's where you 'see' a complete word in your mind's eye, whether you're reading it or writing it. And if you can't visualize it, you're just winging it based on what it sounds like. In a language with as many irregularly spelled words as English, you're going to be wrong a lot of the time." (link found in [livejournal.com profile] griffen's journal)

Seeing a word in my mind's eye.

Right.

If any of you have ever either tried to spell something to me without giving me the time to write it down, or wanted me to tell you how to spell something without me writing it down, you've run head on into the fact that - unless it's three or four letters long, and sometimes not even then - I _cannot_ visualize words in my head.

There are some words I can spell aloud without writing them down first. My name, due to long practice. I think that's about it.

I don't know how many of you have noticed that I also don't tend to say numbers combinations as anything but individual digits. It feels... almost related to the above, but not quite, since the words for numbers (eg 'one') and the symbols used (and '1') are, in fact, a fairly effortful and entirely _not_ automatic translation for me, getting exponentially more difficult the longer the number. This makes (for example) singing a song where someone wrote out something like a year entirely in number symbols rather than words slightly problematic. I tend to not be able to figure it out fast enough and sorta stop singing during that piece.

I can also spell words without writing them down if they happen to be easily - and sensibly - broken into smaller words. If I remember that can be done for any specific word. (Like the name of the town I live in)

I wonder if this somehow relates to my major difficulty with pulling words out of my head? And with games like Scrabble?


Uh. "Reading is transforming letters into sound," according to the article I linked to above. Not in _my_ head, it isn't. Translating what I'm reading into sound is quite a lot more effort for me than reading is. Reading aloud probably means I'm not taking in any of what I'm reading. It's why - for the most part, although I'm getting less averse to it - I tend to not read things aloud. (I'm sure the fact that I process written things better than things I'm hearing comes into effect, as well)

Ok, enough being fascinated by this article. :)
wispfox: (Default)
It frequently frustrates me that when I want to refer to the state of being busy - business - I constantly run into the common meaning of that word. So I cannot use it.

And yet. And yet!

I never noticed that, all too often, business _is_ all about being busy, which link was pointed to by [livejournal.com profile] postvixen in this post.

The funny thing? I'm much too often aware of my propensity for doing too many things at once. For forgetting to take time to relax and chill. And then it bites me, by making me unable to sleep, usually, but if I let it go on too long, making me _COMPLETELY_ anti-social no matter what the season. (Anyone remember my mental state last summer? :) I simply am not one who _can_ work constantly - I have never been. Can't do things like leaving things to the last minute, because if I do that they _won't_ get done. Can't do constant fire fighting (figuratively) because it kills my mental state.

And _still_ I so often have to struggle to remember to chill out and just be. (meditation may not always actually work for me, but even trying it helps immensely)

I often wonder if this is why one of the things that I most prefer to do when I am visiting with friends is simply to sit. Chat a bit, if we want to, but not if we don't. And why I have such difficulty with people who don't seem to know how to turn _off_ their intensity.
wispfox: (Default)
It frequently frustrates me that when I want to refer to the state of being busy - business - I constantly run into the common meaning of that word. So I cannot use it.

And yet. And yet!

I never noticed that, all too often, business _is_ all about being busy, which link was pointed to by [livejournal.com profile] postvixen in this post.

The funny thing? I'm much too often aware of my propensity for doing too many things at once. For forgetting to take time to relax and chill. And then it bites me, by making me unable to sleep, usually, but if I let it go on too long, making me _COMPLETELY_ anti-social no matter what the season. (Anyone remember my mental state last summer? :) I simply am not one who _can_ work constantly - I have never been. Can't do things like leaving things to the last minute, because if I do that they _won't_ get done. Can't do constant fire fighting (figuratively) because it kills my mental state.

And _still_ I so often have to struggle to remember to chill out and just be. (meditation may not always actually work for me, but even trying it helps immensely)

I often wonder if this is why one of the things that I most prefer to do when I am visiting with friends is simply to sit. Chat a bit, if we want to, but not if we don't. And why I have such difficulty with people who don't seem to know how to turn _off_ their intensity.
wispfox: (Default)
So, as previously determined, things I have taken the time to process and sort and stuff are indexed in my head with words. This does include people, even though that's not how I recognize them.

It perioically weirds me out that I can have a word in my head, even use it to find the information I want, but cannot necessarily _communicate_ that word, or even find a similar word (the latter is easier, but sometimes I can get just completely stuck!).

Trying to find a word in writing is easier than when speaking, though.

On the way home, however, I was reminded that while speaking and writing are language specific, they are not the _same_ symbol set. I probably have to translate between them, at some level, at least.

So perhaps it's not quite so strange that I can sometimes find a word easier in writing than in speaking (since speaking takes a _lot_ more processing power for me than writing, similarly to listening vs reading).

And, taking that symbols set stuff further, perhaps the verbal stuff that I have in my head for indexing purposes and for other processed stuff in my head is yet _another_ symbol set. Thereby explaining why I can access things and still not necessarily be able to communicate that word.

No idea if this is even remotely correct, but it makes me less annoyed by my frequent difficulty with finding words.
wispfox: (Default)
So, as previously determined, things I have taken the time to process and sort and stuff are indexed in my head with words. This does include people, even though that's not how I recognize them.

It perioically weirds me out that I can have a word in my head, even use it to find the information I want, but cannot necessarily _communicate_ that word, or even find a similar word (the latter is easier, but sometimes I can get just completely stuck!).

Trying to find a word in writing is easier than when speaking, though.

On the way home, however, I was reminded that while speaking and writing are language specific, they are not the _same_ symbol set. I probably have to translate between them, at some level, at least.

So perhaps it's not quite so strange that I can sometimes find a word easier in writing than in speaking (since speaking takes a _lot_ more processing power for me than writing, similarly to listening vs reading).

And, taking that symbols set stuff further, perhaps the verbal stuff that I have in my head for indexing purposes and for other processed stuff in my head is yet _another_ symbol set. Thereby explaining why I can access things and still not necessarily be able to communicate that word.

No idea if this is even remotely correct, but it makes me less annoyed by my frequent difficulty with finding words.

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